SUPPORT AND INFORMATION FOR PROFESSIONALS

FINDING SUPPORT FOR PROFESSIONALS

Many professionals are concerned that they have not had sufficient or appropriate training to offer grieving families the support they need. Professional carers need a clear understanding of the importance of setting boundaries in their caring relationships, both for themselves and for others.

 

It is important that the professionals involved with a bereaved family work as a team and are able to offer each other support and understanding. The need for support is not a sign of professional inadequacy or personal weakness, but rather a sign of maturity, recognising that you need help to do this work well. Most professional carers are very good at caring for others, but far less good at caring for themselves or for each other.

All carers can benefit from sharing their own feelings and discussing experiences about particular situations with which they have been involved. They also benefit from hearing and learning about other people’s experiences. If you know that one of your colleagues is involved in some stressful work, try to find the time to listen to them and how they feel afterwards. It can make an enormous difference to have a colleague that cares about you. This is no less important if you are a consultant or a manager

Reference: Child Bereavement UK – May 2017

BEREAVEMENT CARE NETWORK

Led by Sands and The Royal College of Midwives (RCM), along with Antenatal Results and Choices (ARC) and Child Bereavement UK,  the updated and improved Bereavement Care Network now includes six further partner charities: Bliss, the Miscarriage Association, Multiple Birth Foundation, Tamba, (Twins and Multiple Births Association), Lullaby Trust and the National Maternity Support Foundation (NMSF).

The Bereavement Care Network is a free online resource for professionals who provide, or have an interest in, bereavement care for parents whose baby dies. The Bereavement Care Network aims to enhance the knowledge, insight and understanding of professionals around bereavement and bereavement care following a pregnancy loss or the death of a baby. It enables professionals to share best practice, exchange ideas, share experiences, ask questions and seek informal peer support. The Bereavement Care Network supports professionals to deliver the best possible bereavement care by keeping users informed of relevant developments, research and resources.

By joining the network, you will have the opportunity to network with other users and gain access to the resources page, one space hosting the relevant resources of 10 charities around bereavement care.

Reference: Sands – June 2017

 

INFORMATION FOR PROFESSIONALS

PERINATAL, NEONATAL AND INFANT DEATHS REGISTERED BY AREA OF USUAL RESIDENCE, UK AND CONSTITUENT COUNTRIES